Happy New Year, 2015

 

 

MarineDiesel extends its’ best wishes to our customers for a happy and prosperous 2015!

 

 

Best of 2014 – VGT Series vs Cummins QSB 5.9 – How do we Compare?

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

The VGT Series of marine engines is MarineDiesel’s flagship product. We originally aimed to make the lightest, most powerful, most reliable engine available in the market, and we succeeded where others have not.

So, how does the VGT Series compare to others?

Price:

MarineDiesel VGT: Mid-range

Cummins QSB 5.9: Low

*Price will vary greatly based on many factors, including import duties and dealer markups, but in general

 

Cost of Spares:

MarineDiesel VGT: Mid-range

Cummins QSB 5.9: Mid-range

*Note: The Cummins engines are sold and serviced through the CMD network, which is largely focused on the recreational market

 

Rating:

MarineDiesel VGT: Commercial / Military Medium to Heavy use

Cummins QSB 5.9: Recreational

 

Engine Block:

MarineDiesel VGT: V-8

Cummins QSB 5.9: Inline 6

*Inline cylinder arrangements tend to produce higher levels of vibration

 

Weight:

MarineDiesel VGT: 500 kg

Cummins QSB 5.9: 658 kg

 

Fuel Consumption:

MarineDiesel VGT: Max 220 g / kWh

Cummins QSB 5.9: Max 235 g/kWh

 

Curves:

vgt400 fuel

 

vgt400 curves

Cummins QSB 5.9 Power Curve

Cummins QSB 5.9 Power Curve

 

 

 

Best of 2014 – VGT Series vs Yanmar 6LY3 Series. How do we compare?

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

The VGT Series of marine engines is MarineDiesel’s flagship product. We originally aimed to make the lightest, most powerful, most reliable engine available in the market, and we succeeded where others have not.

So, how does the VGT Series compare to others?

Price:

MarineDiesel VGT: Mid-range

Yanmar 6LY3: Inexpensive to Mid-range

*Price will vary greatly based on many factors, including import duties and dealer markups, but in general

 

Cost of Spares:

MarineDiesel VGT: Mid-range

Yanmar 6LY3: Expensive

 

 

Rating:

MarineDiesel VGT: Commercial / Military Medium to Heavy use

Yanmar 6LY3: Recreational

 

Engine Block:

MarineDiesel VGT: V-8

Yanmar 6LY3: Inline 6

*Inline cylinder arrangements tend to produce higher levels of vibration

 

Weight:

MarineDiesel VGT: 500 kg

Yanmar 6LY3:640 kg

 

Fuel Consumption:

MarineDiesel VGT: Max 220 g / kWh

Yanmar 6LY3: Max 221 g/kWh

 

Curves:

vgt400 fuel

vgt400 curves

 

Yanmar 6LY3 ETP Power, Torque, and Fuel Curves

Yanmar 6LY3 ETP Power, Torque, and Fuel Curves

Best of 2014 – 10 Quickest Ways to Ruin your Diesel Engine

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

MarineDiesel prides itself on manufacturing engines of the highest quality, yet, sometimes we see things that make us scratch our heads and say, “What were they thinking?”

So, without further adieu, below is the list of ten things that we guarantee will kill your diesel engine as fast as a stick of dynamite:

  1. Not changing fuel filters, or, even worse, running without filters. (“But hey! Filters get EXPENSIVE”. Seriously, have you SEEN the fuel in Nigeria?)
  2. Not following engine break-in procedure
  3. Not changing air filters
  4. Not changing oil filters
  5. Not letting the engine warm up
  6. Not checking for leaks (at least until there is no oil left)
  7. Full throttle, 100% of the time
  8. Not starting the engine regularly. Sludge is never a good thing. (see below)
  9. Not checking fuel quality (Condensation? Nah… Not on this boat)
  10. Not checking temperatures. (You think that plastic bag blocking the strainer might cause overheating?)

BONUS: If you think that duct tape makes a permanent repair, no further comment is necessary.

 

 

Happy Holidays

 

 

MarineDiesel extends warmest wishes to our customers during this Christmas and holiday season!

Best of 2014 – Interview with Andreas Blomdahl

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

This week’s article is an interview with our CEO, Mr. Andreas Blomdahl. Andreas will be contributing periodic columns to this site in the future, keeping MarineDiesel customers up to date with the latest developments coming from the very top.

 

Q1: Why did you start MarineDiesel?

Coming from and engineering background and doing some racing for a while it was clear that the products on the market where very old in design and that it was time for someone to think outside the box in the marine industry. The goal from the start was to bring something different to the market, a more powerful while durable product in a small package, I feel we have succeeded in the VGT engine line.

 

Q2: What was your biggest challenge in setting up MarineDiesel?

The marine industry is a very small industry especially on the engine side, mostly the same companies that have been around for a long time. The main challenge isn’t so much the products as to establishing distribution worldwide, this takes time and on the technical side the emission will become a challenge for the future, rightfully so as the marine engines are far from what they are capable in regards to emissions.

 

Q3: What are MarineDiesel’s goals for the future?

MarineDiesel will continue to manufacture the world’s best performance marine diesel engines for the commercial and governmental markets. Any new products must meet our strict policies as we are in the backbone an engineering company that also has a production of marine engines.

 

Q4: Where do you see MarineDiesel in the next five years?

MarineDiesel is currently expanding its distribution network and increasing production capacity in order to meet current and future demand. MarineDiesel will be recognized for putting out some cutting edge products on the market over the five years to come.

 

Q5: Any new developments coming in the next year?

Yes, there are but unfortunately I can’t tell you about them so just keep your eyes open.

 

Q6: What are the biggest advantages of MarineDiesel’s products over the products of its’ rivals?

We have market leading power to weight ratio on our products while designing them from day one for the commercial field, not for pleasure crafts. Apart from the products, our organization is set up in a different way where we ask our customers how we best can assist them in regards to training, support etc, most of our competitors tell the clients how it needs to be structured instead of listening to individual requirements.

 

Q7: What has been MarineDiesel’s biggest success?

The VGT engine series

 

Q8: Anything you wish you could have done differently?

Many things but we try not to dwell on the past but to improve and look to the future, it’s more productive.

 

Q9: Any further thoughts?

Make sure you get a test ride on a vessel equipped with with VGT engines. It’s a completely different animal to what else is on the market today. 

 

Founder and CEO.

 Andreas Blomdahl, 43, has been the CEO since 1992 is also on the board of directors for Marinediesel as well as a few other Scandinavian companies.

 A native of Angelholm Sweden, Andreas has an engineering degree from the university of Lund and has a long time passion for the marine field.

 

Andreas Blomdahl

 

 

Best of 2014 – Industrial Engine Week, Airboats

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

Today is the final day of our industrial engine week, and we focus on a niche market that has been up-and-coming for MDPT over the last couple of years: Airboats. Hmmm…

Industrial?

Correct. Airboats are a special case that is handled by MDPT rather than the larger MarineDiesel group because airboats are a hybrid of sorts. They are boats, but they use engines that are engineered for use on land. This makes them unique in the marine world.

Traditionally, airboats were simple vehicles: A shallow, flat bottomed boat with a (usually) used aircraft engine mounted astern that featured a direct coupling to an aircraft propeller straight off the flywheel. Ratios were inexact, with propeller pitch largely used to control performance levels.

Modern airboats bear little more than a casual resemblance to these old vessels. Modern airboats can now be equipped with climate controlled cabins, gun positions for military use, and are always equipped with modern, compact and high powered engines. Propellers are designed with lightweight composites, and there are complex gear or belt drive systems that can include variable gear ratios. Indeed, some airboats are now equipped with contra-rotating dual props that provide huge amounts of torque and extremely high speeds.

Airboats are often commonly seen in the Everglades, or on TV shows like “Swamp People”, and so on. They handle conditions in swamps quite well, being shallow draft and not having any propeller to run aground or get snagged. However, there are many other applications for airboats, and this niche market is booming: Military use for patrol, rescue, use on ice. All of these uses are now common.

For more information:

Leppek, Adam P., “Optimization of an Airboat Design” (2012). Honors Theses. Paper 2180. offers a good and interesting overview of modern airboat design and why airboats are well suited for their application.

MDPT is at the forefront of powering some of these cutting-edge designs. Our marine heritage serves us well in providing specialized engines for airboats. As we mentioned earlier, airboats are a hybrid of sorts. They use engines designed for use on land, but they are exposed to the harsh marine environment. We have the ability to combine these two fields of expertise into a single, customized and application-specific product, with appropriate injectors, connectors, and cooling systems. We also work very closely with the drive manufacturers, propeller manufacturers, and designers to offer complete airboat propulsion packages.

We have completed airboat projects in Russia, Finland, the USA, Australia, and Thailand, and this market segment is becoming a specialty of MDPT. Contact us today on your next project, but please see below for some previous MDPT installations.

PantherDuramaxFinland AA 022012022??????????????????STAATSOLIE

Best of 2014 – Engine Room Ventilation

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

MarineDiesel designs its’engines with reliability and service life being key concerns. Using a Duramax block as a foundation for our VGT Series of engines, the product is reliable and trouble-free as long as regular maintenance is performed when due.

There are, however, two situations that can greatly reduce engine life. The first is the use of dirty fuel. The second is inadequate ventilation of the engine compartment.

This situation is most prevalent in tropical, or hot, climates.

All engines produce a tremendous amount of heat. That is how they operate and why they produce power. In order to operate continuously, they must be adequately cooled, with ample ventilation provided for continued operation.

This is where problems can arise. The VGT Series, in particular, being so compact, is often used in very small craft, such as RHIBs, that have very small engine compartments as part of their design. Small, tight, engine compartments tend to lack much ventilation, and therefore ventilation must be provided in order to ensure trouble free operation.

From MDS, our service team:

Engine power is affected by a number of different external factors. Among the most important are air pressure and volume, air temperature and exhaust backpressure. Deviations from the normal values affect engine performance, function and reliability.
Diesel engines require a large amount of air compared to petrol engines. Reductions from the required values show up first of all as an increase in exhaust black smoke. This can be particularly noticeable at the planing threshold when the engine torque demands are high. If the deviations from the required values are great, the engine will lose power. This power loss can
be so great that a planing boat cannot pass through the planing threshold. For the engine to function properly and give full power, it is absolutely essential that both the inlet and outlet air ducts are sufficiently dimensioned and installed correctly.

Two main conditions must be fulfilled.

1. The engine must get enough air (oxygen) to allow efficient combustion.
2. The engine room must be ventilated so that the temperature can be kept down to an acceptable level.

Ventilation is also important to keep the engine’s electrical equipment and fuel system temperature at an acceptable level and for general cooling of engine components.

Basic design.

Engine space ventilation should be considered at an early stage and well before the engine is installed as it is often has to be integrated into the boat structure. Guidelines for air intake area are provided in the installation data and we have provided basic formulae in this section if you wish to calculate your own. Air intake area should never be underspecified, it is always better to have too much than too little. Intake air should always be directed to the bottom of the space and exhausted at the highest part preferably on the opposite diagonal to promote good circulation and natural convection.

There are two schools of thought concerning engine space ventilation, that of the engine manufacturer and that of the boat builder. Most engine manufacturers recommend forcing air into the engine space to provide positive pressure to ensure adequate air supply and ventilation for the engine. Boat builders on the other hand tend to favour extracting air from the engine space to provide a small negative pressure, this can prevent engine odours and fumes entering the passenger compartment through cable and hose ducting, etc.
Either system can be used for MarineDiesel engines but we prefer forcing air into the engine space and having properly sealed engine rooms to prevent odours and fumes. If air is to be drawn out using a fan then we recommend adding the CFM of the fan to that of the engine when working out your air intake area.

Engine room depression.

The maximum engine room depression is 0.5 kPa at full speed, this should be checked in every circumstance irrespective of the type ventilation system used.

Dimension of air intakes and ducts.

The engine itself sucks in air very effectively and naturally will take in air from any direction. Should the inlet or outlet air ducts be under dimensioned, the engine will consequently suck air from both ducts and no ventilation air will go out through the outlet air ducts. This causes dangerously high engine room temperatures and potential engine damage. Most of the radiant heat from the engine must be transported out of the engine room. This is an absolute requirement to keep the engine room temperature below the permitted maximum limit.

Engine room temperature.

Remembering that the engine’s performance figures apply at a test temperature of +25°C, it is important that the inlet air temperature is kept as low as possible. The temperature of the inlet air at the air filters should not be higher than +25 °C for full power output.

There is always a loss of power with increased temperatures and if the engine’s inlet air is constantly above +45°C the engine ECM will de-rate the engine as a safety measure. During sea trials the air temperature in the air filter should not exceed 20 °C above ambient temperature or 45°C maximum.

Location of air ducts.

Air intakes should be located where there is a clean flow of air and away from low pressure zones of the boat structure. They should be designed in such a way as not to allow water ingress into the engine space and provide a dry air supply for the engine(s). Care should be exercised with multiple engine installations to ensure air is delivered effectively to all the engines. If louvers are used, the air inlets should be louvered forward and the air outlets louvered towards the stern, this will encourage ventilation on naturally vented systems. Blowers and/or extractors can also be incorporated if deemed necessary. The channels or ducts for the engine air supply should be routed up as close as possible to the air filters but with a minimum distance of 20–30 cm (8–12″) as a precaution should water enter them.

All channels and ducts must be routed so that the least possible flow resistance is obtained. The bends must not be sharp but softly rounded. The smallest radius should be equal to the internal area. Restrictions must always be avoided.
The ducts should be cut obliquely at the ends to assist flow.

NOTE!

Air intakes or outlet holes must never be installed in the transom. The air in this area is turbulent and usually a mix of water and exhaust fumes and must therefore never be allowed to enter the engine or boat.

Function of air intakes.

Air intakes and outlets must function well even in bad weather and must therefore have efficient water traps. Soundproofing must usually be built in. The air intake and outlet should be placed as far away from each other as possible so that a good
through-flow is obtained. If the intake and outlet are too close, the air can re circulate resulting in poor ventilation.

Engine’s air consumption.

The engine consumes a certain amount of air in the combustion process. This requires a minimum internal area of air supply ducting, the minimum area can be calculated by using this formula.

A = 1.9 × engine power output in Kw
A = Area in cm²

The area of the outlet ventilation ducting can be calculated to be a minimum of a third of the air intake ducting area. The value applies for non-restricted intake and up to 1m (3.3 ft) duct length with only one 90 degree bend. The bending radius should be at least twice the internal area. If longer ducts or more bends are used, the area is corrected by multiplying a coefficient from Table
1 below.

eng vent1

Ambient temperature.

The ambient air temperature, (outdoor air temperature) is assumed to be +30°C (86°F). Correction factors as per Table 2 below should be applied as required by multiplying the calculated area by the correction factor.

eng vent2

A - Air should exit the engine bay and the upper section B – Air should enter the engine bay at the lower section

A – Air should exit the engine bay and the upper section
B – Air should enter the engine bay at the lower section

 

 

 

Best of 2014 – VGT Series vs Volvo Penta D Series. How do we compare?

 

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

 

The VGT Series of marine engines is MarineDiesel’s flagship product. We originally aimed to make the lightest, most powerful, most reliable engine available in the market, and we succeeded where others have not.

So, how does the VGT Series compare to others?

Price:

MarineDiesel VGT: Mid-range

Volvo Penta D-Series: Expensive

*Price will vary greatly based on many factors, including import duties and dealer markups, but in general

 

Cost of Spares:

MarineDiesel VGT: Mid-range

Volvo Penta D-Series: Very Expensive

*Note: The Volvo Penta engines require special diagnostics tools for maintenance.

 

Rating:

MarineDiesel VGT: Commercial / Military Medium to Heavy use

Volvo Penta D-Series: Recreational

 

Engine Block:

MarineDiesel VGT: V-8

Volvo Penta D-Series: Inline 6

*Inline cylinder arrangements tend to produce higher levels of vibration

 

Weight:

MarineDiesel VGT: 500 kg

Volvo Penta D-6: 785 kg

 

Fuel Consumption:

MarineDiesel VGT: Max 220 g / kWh

Volvo Penta D-6: Max 225 g/kWh

 

Curves:

d6400 curves

MD VGT 450 Power and Torque Curves

MD VGT 450 Power and Torque Curves

 

Best of 2014 – Engine Selector Guide

 

We wish all MarineDiesel customers a happy holiday season. Our factory will close from December 22 through January 5. For the balance of the year, we will be re-running our most popular articles from 2014, based on the number of visitors. We will start new daily articles in the New Year. We hope that you continue to find them interesting.

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